15 comments

  1. Don QuiScottie

    Ah, yes… Reds

    Six big tiles though, and 13 little whites, etc… so I think the complexity leaves much to be decoded. More complex titles beckon: “Red times White Makes BigRed”, for example 🙂

      • Don QuiScottie

        You failed chemistry? … Uh oh…. So you are one of them eh? … Our minds may be incompatible… Should be ok so long as we don’t meet, but a handshake might result in our mutual destruction in a violent explosion 🙂 A student once asked me “why does the way the world works have to be so complicated?” to which I replied, “It’s not my fault…,” to which she (for yes it was very much a she) replied, “well it damn well feels like it’s your fault by half past three every Friday afternoon.” I don’t think she liked having a chemistry lecture on a Friday afternoon, poor thing 🙂 It just made matters worse when I tried to persuade her that actually what was more surprising was how simple the world was, in some ways. She transferred to another course soon after that

        • Syncopated Eyeball

          Yes, I failed it at school in the final year. I knew I would. I was sick and off school for about a month and when I returned a good inch or so of the monstrous chemistry book had been covered. To catch up? I couldn’t be bothered learning by rote a whole bunch of what to me was going to be useless information. So I pretty well gave up trying at all and spent at least some of the class time knitting a multi-coloured striped scarf. under the desk.

          The teacher would conduct an experiment from time to time. We all watched and saw that what she said was going to happen quite often didn’t. To add insult to boredom we then had to repeat the experiment in pairs so we could see once again that what was supposed to happen didn’t and then learn some formula/equation that described what hadn’t happened. :p

        • Don QuiScottie

          Rather a sad experience of practical chemistry that! (What you say below, since your comment is missing its reply button). Be assured, the problem was with the teacher not with the chemistry. Chemistry is reliable, 100%.

        • Syncopated Eyeball

          I think it was more than just the teacher: also how the whole course was presented. It seemed SO abstract, that it hardly seemed to relate to anything mundane when surely the opposite is true.

          Apart from that, nothing beats a teacher (in whatever context) who has a sincere enthusiasm for, a delight in, their subject. And the ability to communicate that.
          There used to be a man called Peter Cundell on a television gardening show who could make me share his love of his handful of compost. He held it as if it were a bunch if flowers. He said it was beautiful.

  2. healingmagichands

    I like the contrasts in this one. I am still amazed by the different way you look at the world. I would probably walk past that wall and never think of it as something that needed to be photographed…

    • Syncopated Eyeball

      Thank you, Ellie.
      The other day in the kitchen I turned on the tap at the sink. The force of the water made bubbles come and go, and the sun was shining on them and the metal. I said to someone in the kitchen ‘Oh, look!’ and pointed. ‘What?’ he said. ‘The bubbles’ I said. ‘What?’ he said. ‘The bubbles! Aren’t they pretty?’ I said. ‘Oh’ he said.

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